Benefit For the Brooklyn Breast Cancer Program

Reader Abby wrote to me today and asked me to help her promote an upcoming breast cancer awareness event. It’s in New York, so if you find yourself in the area on October 21, you might want to join in on the festivities. Here’s the full scoop:

BENEFIT FOR THE BROOKLYN BREAST CANCER PROGRAM AT MAIMONIDES CANCER CENTER:

Be an honored guest and join Dr. Patrick I. Borgen, Director of the Brooklyn Breast Cancer Program, for an evening to benefit the Brooklyn Breast Cancer Program at Maimonides Medical Center. Taking place, Thursday October 21, 2010, at the Brooklyn Museum (200 Eastern Parkway), the event will begin at 6:00 PM with cocktails, light supper, and a gallery tour, followed by a delightful program at 7:30 PM.

Special recognition will be paid to breast cancer activists, Stewart Krentzman and Sandra van den Broek. Put on your festive business attire and come be a part of a great evening and an important cause. Don’t forget to jazz up with some PINK! For information about sponsorship opportunities or ticket pricing please contact the Benefit Office at 212.675.9474 (ext 14), or: nlevinson@sualtd.com.

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Eat Eggs to Boost Health

You say the egg has been demonized over the years? Explain.
The egg has been demonized because of two reasons: One, its cholesterol content, and two, its saturated fat content. Both are nothing to worry about. It’s now well known and established that DIETARY cholesterol has virtually no effect on serum (blood) cholesterol, and many health professionals (such as myself) doubt whether blood cholesterol is even as big a health issue as the mainstream health organizations believe it is. In any case, cholesterol in the egg does not raise your blood cholesterol. And most of the fat in egg yolk is monounsaturated — plus the saturated fat from whole foods (like eggs) is rarely, if ever, a problem anyway.
Eggs whites only — healthier or not necessary?
Completely not necessary — see above. In addition, there are wonderful nutrients like lutein and zeaxanthin (for the eyes) and choline (for the brain) that are in the yolk!
Name a few good qualities of the egg?
One of the most bioavailable sources of protein on the planet. Cage-free eggs also contain omega-3 fats, and the yolks are the source of a number of very important nutrients (see above).
How often should we be eating eggs? Is there such thing as too many eggs in a diet?
There’s no “right” answer to this. Eggs should be in “heavy rotation” along with foods like berries, wild salmon, and nuts. Eat as often as you like.
Name a few simple ways to incorporate eggs into a diet.
Hard boiled, sliced over a spinach salad, hard boiled as a snack (with fruit or cheese), scrambled, omlettes, even raw in a protein drink a la Rocky!
www.egglandsbest.com

I received a comment on one of my posts the other day from a guy stating that he treats cancer naturally — no surgery, chemo, or radiation necessary. His focus is on food, and here’s one tip he offered: “please stop eating eggs, even if they are from veg fed chicken.”

I guess he’s been reading my egg-inspired posts and wanted to weigh in.

Well, is he right? Should I stop eating eggs? Should you stop eating eggs?

According to Jonny Bowden, renowned author and America’s top nutrition, anti-aging, and weight loss expert, the answer is a big, fat NO. Bowden believes there is a definite place for eggs in a healthy diet, and he told me all about it.

Me: You say the egg has been demonized over the years? Explain.

Jonny: The egg has been demonized because of two reasons: One, its cholesterol content, and two, its saturated fat content. Both are nothing to worry about. It’s now well known and established that DIETARY cholesterol has virtually no effect on serum (blood) cholesterol, and many health professionals (such as myself) doubt whether blood cholesterol is even as big a health issue as the mainstream health organizations believe it is. In any case, cholesterol in the egg does not raise your blood cholesterol. And most of the fat in egg yolk is monounsaturated — plus the saturated fat from whole foods (like eggs) is rarely, if ever, a problem anyway.

Me: Eggs whites only — healthier or not necessary?

Jonny: Completely not necessary — see above. In addition, there are wonderful nutrients like lutein and zeaxanthin (for the eyes) and choline (for the brain) that are in the yolk!

Me: Name a few good qualities of the egg?

Jonny: One of the most bioavailable sources of protein on the planet. Cage-free eggs also contain omega-3 fats, and the yolks are the source of a number of very important nutrients (see above).

Me: How often should we be eating eggs? Is there such thing as too many eggs in a diet?

Jonny: There’s no “right” answer to this. Eggs should be in “heavy rotation” along with foods like berries, wild salmon, and nuts. Eat as often as you like.

Me: Name a few simple ways to incorporate eggs into a diet.

Jonny: Hard boiled sliced over a spinach salad, hard boiled as a snack (with fruit or cheese), scrambled, omelettes, even raw in a protein drink a la Rocky!

Thank you, Jonny!

OK, so if you’re an egg eater, or you’re thinking of becoming one, consider Eggland’s Best for your next purchase. They’ve always been tops when it comes to nutrition, but now, EB eggs are more nutritious than ever. Buy them this month, and you’ll be in on the pink partnership — EB is donating $50,000 to Susan G. Komen for the Cure, and each individual egg is stamped with the pink ribbon logo to prove it.

pink-dozen-logo-100jd092910

This post is sponsored by Eggland’s Best. I received monetary compensation for my participation, but my review and opinions are my own.

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